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Family Background & the Beginning of Awareness

This is my piece of the puzzle.  This information was received by me in an intuitive, co-creative process with the Universe because I really wanted to know the truth of who built the megaliths, and it led to all the information I shared in my video and much more.  It is clear to me that this information was given to me to bring it to light.  Please watch the foundational video on this blog of “Physical Evidence for the Layout of a Planetary Grid System…and a Suppressed Global Civilization.

 

There is no place on the planet that this civilization is not.  Like I said in the video, the evidence is all around us, and below us, and hidden in plain sight.  Literally just outside our front doors, in our back yards, in our neighborhoods, in our parks, and road system.

The purpose of this blog is to show you exactly why I believe this, and provide much, much more evidence to support my belief, and information on other related topics.  Not knowing this information allows all the many crimes against Humanity, the Planet, and the Creator/Creation to continue unabated because no one knows about it.  It has been well-hidden for a reason by those who wish to harm us all for power, control, and energy.  Everything is changing, and this information needs to come back out into collective awareness as soon as possible.

I also believe, that up until 500 or so years ago, Humanity was on a positive evolutionary path and in Unity Consciousness, and that around 1492 was the beginning of the hijack of this timeline by dark forces, and the replacement of it with one called Rome.  Can’t tell you how this was done, just that it looks like that is what happened because the Ancient Global Civilization built everything on the planet.  The same styles/designs cross oceans and continents, from ancient to modern!!!

I am going to start at the beginning of my life, because this is a lifelong pathway that ultimately connected me to the Truth.  I wasn’t consciously aware of my spiritual path, and its direct connections to this information, for most of my life.  But I was connected to it from the very beginning of my life.  I am almost 55-years-old.  It has taken me most of that time to put all these puzzle pieces   together.  Starting this process by telling you about specific moments of awareness in my life journey is ultimately the best way to organize an overwhelming amount of information.

I am from a White, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant (AKA WASP), solidly middle-class family, primarily with roots in the Deep South.

All my known ancestry goes back to the very beginning of what has come to be known as the United States, starting with the Mayflower’s arrival to the so-called Plymouth Bay Colony (I am a direct descendant of William Brewster, a moving force behind the Pilgrims, and the lay religious leader of the Plymouth Colony until the arrival of its ordained minister several years later) to the 1750’s with the influx of the Scots-Irish, my lineage through my maternal grandmother.  This is in accordance with the history we have been taught.

It is important to note, that on my Dad’s side of the family, the family history was repeated to my generation as that of the Huguenots.  That was all they knew.  No elaboration.  Just that they were French Huguenots.

Up until recently, the Huguenots were recorded in available historical references as Reformed Calvinists.  So the available information not long ago was that for some reason a Protestant Christian sect in France, the Huguenots, were persecuted, and even massacred, for almost 100 years.   Come to find out in the Internet Age, the Huguenots were Cathars and Moors.

I grew up in Montgomery County Maryland, outside of Washington, D.C.  My first home as a small child was in Rockville.   When I was two, my parents moved to Gaithersburg, which is where my earliest conscious memories are.  Not any big hits there until much, much later.

The family church I grew up in was Twinbrook Baptist in Rockville. When I started researching a couple of years ago, I found out that the Twinbrook area is adjacent to Rock Creek.

The softball team, of which my dad, an elementary school teacher and administrator, was a member, practiced at the Meadow Hall Elementary School field, which was right beside the church, just slightly downhill, and was the next street address over on Twinbrook Parkway.

When dad was practicing, and I was young, I, instead of watching the games,  I was always down off into the woods, right off the ball field, exploring.  It was a really cool place, in more ways than one.  What I remember is going down, down into the woods, and eventually finding really big stones to play in.  They were really fun for a 6-, 7-, 8-, or whatever-year-old, to play in and around.

This location was close to Lake Needwood and Lake Frank, and both are man-made lakes.  I will dedicate a future blog exclusively on the role man-made lakes play related to this subject and the cover-up of it.

In 1974, right after the birth of my youngest brother, we moved to a larger home in Rockville.  I always tell people we moved as close to Potomac, Maryland, as my parents could afford.  I lived here until 1982, when, after 1 year of junior college, I joined the Army for the Veterans’ Educational Assistance Program.  So this is where I grew up.

The house was brand new when we moved in – no trees, and the funny, almost comet-green color of sprayed grass seed.

The reason I bring this up is because the street we lived on – Lindley Terrace – on one end, some of the houses had a steep gradient on the backside – I mean really steep!!!  However, the houses were built on a predominantly flat surface.  The house my parents bought was on one of the flattest lots on the street.  This relates to what I now believe was actually underneath us.  Like, a flat-topped pyramid, perhaps?  I mean, when I was a kid, for some reason, I really made a mental note of the unusual features of my neighborhood street.

We were literally right next to the boundary fence of the Lakewood Country Club, with a golf tee area right next to the fence.  I will be dedicating a specific blog on how golf courses relate to the subject of the cover-up of mounds.

As a family we would go occasionally to Thurmont, Maryland, in Western Maryland, to Cunningham Falls State Park.  There was a picnic/swimming area at a lake, and then there were the falls themselves.  So I have memories of climbing up the big rocks of the falls.   I, like everyone else, had no concept in my awareness, that waterfalls could be anything other than natural.  But massive and block-shaped stonework is a recurring feature of waterfalls like what is pictured here.  Take a close look at the shape of the rocks in this photo.

Cunningham Falls

Before moving on from Cunningham Falls, it is important to note that Camp David is located in the vicinity.  As I learned more about earth grids, I found out that Camp David is situated on a nodal point.  It is the norm for centers of power to be on the earth’s power points.  There is a reason for this.

My house was relatively close to Great Falls, Maryland.  Access to the falls themselves, at least when I was young, was cut off after Hurricane Agnes went through in 1972.  There was access to an area with big stones that was fun to hike and climb, as well as the C & O Canal.   So, it was a place I went to many times with family or friends.

When I started to piece together that waterfalls, and canals as well, were part of the Ancient Civilization, I looked up Great Falls.  This is an aerial image of Mather Gorge there.  Now, I think the spin is how this could be natural, but look at how straight it is.

Mather Gorge 1

And here is how it looks closer to earth….

Mather Gorge 2

And then when you realize that part of the ancient civilization involved canal-building (another blog unto itself), then it becomes logical to see this as a canal rather than natural.

This is a picture of the C & O Canal at Harper’s Ferry.  They want us to believe that this was built in the early 1800’s.  So, what is wrong with that date of construction?  This is a sophisticated engineering project.

Harper's Ferry Canal

As a matter of fact, the C & O Canal parallels the Potomac River through this area for a long distance.  What technology existed in America in the late 1700s/early 1800s could have built a sophisticated project like this?  I am not aware of any technology that existed at that time that could have built something like this.  According to our history books, the second Industrial Revolution didn’t begin in the U.S. until the mid-1800s.

Harper's Ferry 2

My conclusion is that the C & O Canal, as well as the Erie Canal, and the St. Lawrence Seaway, and a canal system that covered the continent, was built by the advanced ancient civilization that was long-established here when the Europeans first arrived.  Again, when I say ancient, I mean a very old civilization that was living and flourishing in North America (and South America) when the Europeans first arrived.  And I have much more to say about the use of the word European to describe white people in a later blog based on my findings.  This ancient civilization was global!

 

Circle Alignments on the Planet Washington, DC – Part 9 Boston, Massachusetts to Egypt Beach, Massachusetts

In the last post, I took a close look at these cities on the alignment in Massachusetts: Easton, Brockton, and Weymouth.

I also looked into details around two legendary folk heroes – John Henry, as well as Paul Bunyan, and his travelling companion, Babe the Blue Ox – as possibly giving us glimpses of information into what has actually taken place here, though portrayed as possibly fiction, possibly real from their larger-than-life deeds.

I am starting this post in Boston, slightly to the northwest of this particular alignment. It is definitely an important place to look at while here.

I am going to start this post in the general vicinity of Beacon Hill.

This is a 1775 map of the Shawmut Peninsula, of which Beacon Hill was the center. Land reclamation has been going on here since 1820, to create land, where there was originally water, around the original peninsula.

The area originally had three hills.

Pemberton Hill and Fort Vernon Hill were near Beacon Hill, and both of these hills were levelled for Beacon Hill development.

Beacon Hill itself was reduced from 130-feet, or 42-meters, to 80-feet, or 24-meters, between 1807 and 1832.

The Massachusetts State House is in the Beacon Hill neighborhood. It was said to have been completed in January of 1798, at a cost of $133,333.

It was said to have been designed by Charles Bulfinch, described as the first native-born American to practice architecture as a profession.

Interestingly, the State House sits on top of earthworks, and is constructed in the huge heavy masonry, and other design features, of what would be considered classical architecture.

Not something that one would think could easily be constructed during this time period right after the American Revolutionary War, and before the Industrial Revolution.

This is a view of Beacon Hill neighborhood from sometime in the 1950s…

…taken from the Suffolk County Courthouse. Now called the John Adams Courthouse, it was said to have been completed in 1894.

It is home to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

The Charles River Basin Esplanade is to the west of Beacon Hill, on the riverfront.

Here is a historic depiction of the Charles River Basin Esplanade, circa the time-frame of 1915 – 1930. For some reason, there aren’t many people depicted here.

This is an aerial view of the Charles River Basin before it enters Boston Harbor.

This is a close-up of the Longfellow bridge seen in the aerial view in the middle of the Charles River Basin, with its interesting masonry and towers. In 1927, It was renamed by the Massachusetts General court from the Cambridge Bridge to the Longfellow Bridge in honor of the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, a long-time citizen of Cambridge.

It is described as a steel-rib arch bridge connecting the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston, with the Kendall Square neighborhood of Cambridge.

Beacon Hill is just north of the Boston Common, the oldest city park in the United States, dating since 1634.

This is the Parkman Bandstand in the Boston Common…

…said to have been built in 1912, and named after George F. Parkman in honor of a $5 million donation he willed for the care of the Boston Common and other parks.

The Boston Public Garden is north of Beacon Hill as well, and adjacent to the Boston Common. It is considered the first public botanical garden in America.

Here is an idyllic, peaceful autumn scene in the Boston Public Garden, with the beautiful bridge in the background, the stone embankment in the left foreground, and what looks like megalithic masonry in the right foreground.

The Boston Common and the Boston Public Garden are part of what is called the Emerald Necklace. This is a system of parks said to have been designed by Frederick Law Olmstead in the 1870s to connect the Boston Common to Franklin Park.

Copley Square is a public square in the Back Bay neighborhood of Boston, and named for the painter John Singleton Copley.

Copley Square is notable for the number of Boston’s Cultural institutions here, to include the Old South Church pictured here.

We are told that the present building of the Old South Church was completed in 1873.

Old South was a Congregational Church community said to have had three houses of worship, the dates of which are said to be inscribed on the cornerstone shown here. Is it just me, or does that cornerstone look a little rough? It looks plastered over, and is not the same material as the stone surrounding it. And the “16” of the “1670” date sure looks like it was worked with more than once.

The 1730 date is said to represent the Old South Meeting House pictured here, which gained notoriety as the organizing point for the Boston Tea Party.

Trinity Church is also in Copley Square. It was said to be built in the Richardsonian Romanesque style seen in previous posts on this alignment.

Trinity Church is called the birthplace of Richardsonian Romanesque style, including: Clay roofing; polychromy; rough stone; heavy arches; and massive towers…

…and is said to be Henry Hobson Richardson’s most exceptional architectural achievement.

So far in this circle alignment series, architecture attributed to him has popped up in Jersey City, New Jersey; Easton, Massachusetts; Laramie, Wyoming; and now Boston, Massachusetts.

Interestingly, he never finished architecture school in Paris due to loss of financial backing due to the American Civil War, and additionally he is said to have died at the relatively young age of 47.

The Boston Public Library McKim Building is in Copley Square, said to have been built in 1895.

I find the contrast between the huge and stately masonry of the building to the dirt covered road next to it to be stark, as well as noticing an overall lack of people in the depiction here.

One more place before I leave Boston. I am interested in taking a closer look at Fort Point, a neighborhood in Boston where a fort once stood.

Here is the 1775 map of the Shawmut Peninsula, upon which Boston was built that I showed at the beginning of this post, where there is a star fort depicted on the bottom left.

It is long gone, having been removed in 1869, hill and all, to add more room for business facilities.

Another star fort is nearby in Boston Harbor.

Fort Independence is located on Castle Island, a peninsula in South Boston.

There is an obelisk at Fort Independence.

It is called the Donald McKay Obelisk, after the man who is given credit for building famous clipper ships in Boston…

…like the Flying Cloud, said to have been launched in 1851, and set the record for the fastest passage between New York and San Francisco…

…and the Sovereign of the Seas, said to have been built in 1852, and setting the record for the world’s fastest sailing ship.

The monument at Fort Independence, however, is still an obelisk. It is a tall, four-sided, narrow, tapering monument which ends in a pyramid-shape, or pyramidion, at the top, most commonly associated with Egypt, and not clipper ships, or their builders.

Castle Island and Fort Independence was the location where Prince Hall, and fourteen other men of African-American descent, became Freemasons in their initiation into the British Army Lodge 441 of the Irish Registry, after having been declined admittance into the Boston St. John’s Lodge.

He was the founder of Prince Hall Freemasonry, and the African Grand Lodge of North America.

Until Prince Hall found a way in, Moorish Americans were denied admittance into Freemasonry. There are 360-degrees in Moorish Masonry, compared to the 33-degrees of Freemasonry.

Masonry is based on Moorish Science, which also includes the study of natural and spiritual laws, esoteric symbolism, natal and judicial astrology, and zodiac masonry.

With regards to zodiac masonry, this is where the perfect alignments of infrastructure on earth with the sky comes from – the consummate alignment of earth with heaven that is seen around the world – like the lunar roll along the top of this recumbant stone in Crowthie Muir in Scotland…

…and the alignment with the Orion constellation at the ancient stone circle of Nabta Playa in Egypt. These guys knew exactly what they were doing!

Back to Fort Point, this an historic photo of the Fort Point neighborhood circa 1930…

…and here is a picture of Fort Point today, with the heavy masonry banks of the Fort Point Channel clearly visible in the foreground.

Next, I am getting back on the alignment from where I left off at Weymouth, which is located southeast of Boston, and tracking it to the Hingham, Massachusetts area.

There are two places I would like to look at near Hingham. The first is Wompatuck State Park.

Wompatuck State Park is primarily in Hingham, but has portions of it in the neighboring towns of Cohasset, Scituate, and Norwell as well.

The land was said to have originally belonged to Chief Josiah Wompatuck, who for some unknown reason deeded the land to English settlers in 1655.

There just happens to be a lot of huge, block-shaped rocks here.

The park was said to have been built on the Naval Ammunition Depot Annex, which was in operation from 1941 to 1965, and has over 100 decommissioned military bunkers.

I also want to take a closer look at World’s End near Hingham…

…a park and conservation area located on a peninsula in the Hingham area.

World’s end is described as being comprised of four drumlins.

This is an example of a drumlin, said to have been derived from the Gaelic word”druim,” meaning “mound” or “rounded hill.”

In spite of the artificially-made-looking appearance of drumlins, we are told they were formed by the streamlined movement of glacial ice sheets across rock debris.

Here is another land feature on the top left at World’s End in Hingham, compared with one at the Alter do Chao Beach, near Santarem, Brazil on the top right, and another on Attu Island in the Near Island Group at the far western end of the Aleutian Islands on the bottom.

I don’t see these as having formed naturally – I see them as man-made, and the civilization that made them the same worldwide.

Here is another example of a similar-looking land-feature occurring in two very different places.

On the left is Cape Blossom, on Wrangel Island in the East Siberian Sea, off the far northern coast of Siberia; and on the right is the Chesil Beach Causeway on Portland Island, off the southern coast of England.

I am going to exit Massachusetts on the alignment on the coast at Scituate, Massachusetts.

There must be some connection with the name Scituate here, and the Scituate Reservoir I looked at back in Rhode Island, but I am not sure what the direct connection is. Presumably it has something to do with the people who lived here.

First, here is the Lawson Tower in Scituate, which holds the distinction of being the most ostentatious water tower ever created. It was said to have been built in 1902 to enclose a steel water tank.

Then there is Egypt Beach, which I found looking at Tide Station locations doing research for this post.

It is described as rocky and exposed.

The alignment leaves the Massachusetts coast, and heads across the Atlantic for the southernmost point of the Nova Scotia peninsula, where I will be picking up the alignment on Cape Sable Island in the next post.

Circle Alignments on the Planet Washington, DC – Part 8 Easton, Massachusetts to Weymouth, Massachusetts

In the last post, I tracked the alignment from Waterbury, Connecticut; through Hartford; to Providence, Rhode Island.

I am picking up the alignment in Easton, a town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, that was established in 1694, and incorporated in 1725. In addition, it is part of the six-county definition of the Providence Metropolitan Area (MSA) of Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

In 1803, the Ames Shovel Works was established in Easton.

It became nationally known for providing the shovels for the Union Pacific Railroad, which opened the west. It was said to have been the world’s largest supplier of shovels in the 19th-century.

This is the Oakes Ames Memorial Hall, said to have been commissioned by the children of Congressman Oakes Ames as a gift to the town of Easton, and built between 1879 and 1881.

The architecture of the building is called Richardsonian Romanesque, named after 19th-century architect, Henry Hobson Richardson.

Interestingly, Mr. Richardson is said to have never finished his architecture studies in Paris due to the Civil War. He also is said to have died at the age of 47, after having a prolific career in the design of mind-blowingly sophisticated and ornate buildings of heavy masonry.

Here is an interesting detail of the facade of the house. Ornamental designs like this are typically called pine cones…

…like on the Coat-of-Arms of the city of Augsburg, Germany, which is said to depict a Swiss Pine cone.

I’m quite sure is actually a depiction of the human pineal gland, both of which are based on…

… the Fibonacci Sequence, or Spiral.

Also known as the Third Eye, when activated, the pineal gland opens the door to psychic abilities and is our connection to the Divine. Much has been done to keep the Third Eye of people from opening, including the use of fluoride in toothpaste and water which causes the calcification of the pineal gland. 

The original advanced civilization on earth was learning how to raise Kundalini energy from the base of the spine up to the pineal gland, and thus re-connect with the Divine.

Henry Hobson Richardson is also given credit for designing the adjoining Ames Free Library, pictured on the right.

It was said to have been commissioned by the children of Oliver Ames, Jr, after he left money in his will for the construction of a library. The building we are told took place between 1877 and 1879.

Oliver Ames, Jr, (b. 1807 – d. 1877) was a co-owner of the Ames Shovel Shop. He was also the President of the Union Pacific Railroad from when it met the Central Pacific Railroad in Utah for the completion of the first Transcontinental Railroad in North America.

He was co-owner of the Ames Shovel Shop with his brother, Oakes Ames.

Oakes was a member of the U. S. Congress House of Representatives from Massachusetts 2nd District from 1863-1873. He is credited by many as being the most important influence in building the Union Pacific portion of the first Transcontinental Railroad.

He was also noted for his involvement in the Credit-Mobilier Scandal of 1867, regarding the improper sale of stock of the railroad’s construction company.

He was formally censured by Congress in 1873 for this involvement, and he died in the same year.

He was exonerated by the Massachusetts State Legislature on May 10th, 1883, the 10th-Anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad.

The cities of Ames, Iowa, and Ames, Nebraska, are both said to be named for Oakes Ames, and were stops on the Union Pacific Railroad.

This is the Ames Monument near Laramie in Wyoming.

This large pyramid was said to have been also designed by Henry Hobson Richardson, and built between 1880 and 1882. It was dedicated to the Ames brothers for their role in financing the Union Pacific Railroad.

This is the Rockery in the center of North Easton, also known as the Memorial Cairn, said to be a unique Civil War memorial designed by Frederick Law Olmstead in 1882.

Next on the alignment is Brockton, one of the two county seats of Plymouth County, along with the city of Plymouth.

This is the Brockton City Hall, said to have been built in the Romanesque architectural style by local architect Wesley Lyng Minor between 1892 and 1894.

Brockton High School, said to have been built in 1870, is the largest high school in Massachusetts, and one of the largest in the United States, with over 4,200 students.

Famous alumni of Brockton High School include boxing legends Rocky Marciano, the only Heavyweight champion to retire undefeated as champion…

…and Marvelous Marvin Hagler (his legal name), the undisputed Middleweight champion between 1980 and 1987.

Brockton partly derives its nickname of “City of Champions” in honor of these two boxing champions.

In the early 1900’s, Brockton was known as “the Shoe City.”

By 1919, there were said to be 39 different shoe manufacturers, employing 13,000 people. Like the George E. Keith Company’s Walk-over Shoes.

Here is the Howard and Foster Shoe Factory in Brockton on the left, and the on the right is the Sessions House of the Bermuda Parliament in Hamilton, Bermuda. Not identical, but there are certainly some similarities going on here.

This an historic depiction of the W. L. Douglas Shoe Factory in Brockton.

On the left is the central architectural feature of this shoe factory, and on the right is Massandra Palace in Yalta, on the Crimean Peninsula. Again not identical, but quite similar-looking.

The R. B. Grover Shoe Factory of Brockton pictured here is associated with a disaster.

In 1905, a boiler-explosion is said to have levelled the building, killing 58 people and injuring 150. This tragedy led to more stringent safety laws and a national code governing the safe operation of steam boilers.

Next on the alignment I am being guided to look closely at Weymouth, said to be the second-oldest settlement in Massachusetts.

It held the distinction of having the oldest continuous town meeting form of government from the time of its founding in 1635 to 1999, when it changed to a city form of government.

John Fogg, a Weymouth boot and shoe manufacturer, had left money for the erection of a building to be used as a library. The Fogg Library on Columbian Square was said to have been built in 1897, and dedicated in 1898.

It is joined on Columbian Square by the Fogg Opera House, said to have been built in 1887 for John Fogg.

It is now just known as the Fogg Building. Looks like its missing a cupola from that tower now. I wonder why it was removed?

Weymouth is bordered by Hingham Bay and Boston Harbor on the north, and its territory includes three of the Boston Harbor Islands Recreation Area – Grape, Slate, and Sheep Islands.

Fort Warren is a star fort on Georges Island in Boston Harbor, named after the Revolutionary War hero Dr. James Warren, said to have been designed by U. S. Army Corps of Engineers Lt. Colonel Sylvanus Thayer, and built between 1834 and 1860.

During the Civil War, it served as a prison for Confederate officers and government officials. This is the Sally Port at Fort Warren, which was the secure and controlled entryway to the prison.

There are a number of lighthouses in the Boston Harbor Islands Recreation Area. Check out the huge masonry blocks in the foreground of this photo, showing the lighthouse in the background.

This is another view of what appears to be the same lighthouse…

…compared with the similar rocky and shaped terrain at Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse in Nova Scotia.

I will be tracking the alignment in the next post through this part of Nova Scotia.

Based on what has come up in the research for this particular post, I want to conclude this post with thoughts on two examples of what we are taught is folklore, but which I think contains glimpses of information about what has taken place here.

The first is the legend of John Henry. This statue of John Henry is at the John Henry Museum in Talcott, West Virginia.

Behind him is the Great Bend Tunnel of the Big Bend of the Greenbrier River in West Virginia. It was said to have been built between 1870 and 1872.

John Henry was said to have worked as a steel-driving man, tasked with hammering a steel drill into rock to make holes for explosives to blast the rock in constructing a railroad tunnel. He was said to have died after winning a race against a steam-powered rock-drilling machine.

This is one of the places that claims to be where this epic contest took place.

This is what the interior of the Great Bend Tunnel looks like, the construction of which we are told started five years after the end of the Civil War.

Why were the Ames Shovel Shop’s shovels so important to the opening of the railroad to the West? One would think you would need way more than shovels, and explosives, to do this kind of sophisticated engineering work.

What if, instead of constructing, they were actually digging already existing infrastructure out of mud?

The other legendary folk hero I would like to address is Paul Bunyan, and his buddy, Babe the Blue Ox .

Here they are at St. Ignace, in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, with Castle Rock in the background.

Castle Rock even has two turrets!

There is a lot of evidence out there about the existence of giants all over the world, including North America, that has been squelched, secreted away, or destroyed.

Regardless of the accuracy of the physical appearance upon which the legend of Paul Bunyan was based, because it is not representative of the giants who were actually here from ancient times, I can show you evidence for the existence of a creature like Babe the Blue Ox.

This is Blue Babe, said to be a 36,000 year old steppe bison found near Fairbanks, Alaska.  This is an exhibit at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Museum.

Take from this what you will.

One of the places that Paul Bunyan is said to be from is Wausau, Wisconsin. I looked into this place specifically because Wausau, looks like it is connected to Washa, or Washitaw. Variations of the same name.

Wausau was said to have been established in 1852.

There is a suburb of Wausau named Rothschild.

Take from this what you will also….

There are a lot of inconsistencies and holes in the history we have been taught.

I will end this post here, and in the next post will first check out nearby Boston, slightly northwest of the alignment, before tracking the alignment across the Atlantic Ocean to Nova Scotia.

Circle Alignments on Planet Washington, DC – Part 7 Waterbury, Connecticut to Providence, Rhode Island

In the last three posts, I focused on the Lower New York Bay, the Upper New York Bay, and the Lower Hudson River in Manhattan in New York and New Jersey because there was so much to see there.

I am picking up the alignment in this post in Waterbury, the second-largest city in Connecticut, and is nicknamed “The Brass City.”

It is located on the Naugatuck River, which is 40-miles, or 64-kilometers, long in Connecticut.

This is the Union Station Clock Tower in Waterbury…

…compared with the clock tower of the Palazzo Vecchio in the Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy…

…this clock tower in Menomonie, Wisconsin…

…and the Great Mosque in El Obeid in the country of Sudan.

Waterbury was the location of Holy Land USA, a theme park inspired by passages from the Bible. It was opened in 1955…

…and closed in 1985. It is in an advanced state of disrepair.

It reminds me a lot of Cappadocia in appearance, an ancient region in Central Anatolia of Turkey.

This is the outside of the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, with its classical-looking Renaissance Revival architectural style.

This is the inside of the Basilica, and said to have been built between 1924 and 1928…

..and based on the Basilica of Saint Mary Major in Rome, with the present basilica said to date back to the 5th-century AD, and on-going work on it until 1400s and 1500s during the Italian Renaissance.

So let me get this straight – Italian-Renaissance-style architecture was being built in the 1920’s in America? Really?

This is a section of the Waterbury Hospital…

…compared with the interior of the Mezquita in Cordoba, Spain. It is called a notable piece of Moorish architecture, and was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1984.

The next place on the alignment is Hartford the capital, and the fourth-largest city, in the State of Connecticut.

Its nickname is the “Insurance Capital of the World.”

It sits on the Connecticut River, with its masonry banks…

…and the longest River in New England at 406 miles (or 653 Kilometers), going from the United States Border with Quebec to Long Island Sound.

This is an aeriel view of the Connecticut River, the border between Vermont on the left, and New Hampshire on the right. Quite a geometric-looking zig-zag going on here with this river!

I have seen countless examples illustrating that manmade canals are being called rivers and natural to cover-up the advanced ancient civilization.

Hartford has an underground river, named the Park River. It was said to have been built by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers in the 1940s as a way to control flooding. It is called the Park River Conduit System.

This historic engineering project was said to have been completed in 1943.

This overlaps with the United States’ involvement in World War II, which started in December of 1941. Big public works project like this in war-time?

Bushnell Park is the oldest publicly-funded park in the United States, having been around since 1854.

The Bushnell Park arch was said to have been designed by Hartford architect George Keller to honor Hartford citizens who had served in the Civil War. It is called the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch, with the beautiful bridge nearby.

This is the Stag Statue in Bushnell Park. Symbol of Hartford and Insurance …

…that I remember, somewhere in the deep recesses of my brain, from commercials in the early 1970s.

This was Hoadley Bridge in Bushnell Park. When the Park River was created, it is said to have become a pedestrian entrance to the park. It apparently no longer exists in its historical form.

It is reminiscent of the Burnside Bridge at Antietam, the site of a Civil War battle…

…the old bridge near Loch Sligachan on the Isle of Skye off the coast of Scotland…

…and this old bridge in Ethiopia, northwest of Addis Ababa…

…near the monastery of Debre Libanos. I am including this picture of the monastery showing the proportional and geometric symmetry between the building in the background, and the arch in the foreground, like what I highlighted in the last post in New York City…

…and the same effect is seen in Hartford through the Bushnell Park Memorial Arch…

…and at this mosque in Grozny, Chechnya. The same effect is found worldwide, and is not a random occurrence.

The Connecticut Capitol building is located near Bushnell Park. It was said to have been built between 1872 and 1878.

Within 7- to 12-years of the end of the American Civil War, the capability to build this existed?

The Wadsworth Atheneum is in the vicinity of Bushnell Park and the State Capitol Building.

It is the oldest continually operating public art museum in the United States since its opening in 1844.

This is the Church of the Good Shepherd in Hartford. It is connected to the firearm-manufacturing Colt family, as it is said to have been commissioned in 1866 by the widow of Sam Holt after his death in 1862 as a memorial to him, and four of their children who had died. It was completed in 1869. The Civil War ended in 1865.

For comparison, this is Saint Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, Austria.

This was the Colt Armory circa 1857.

…and the Colt Armory today. Wow, that’s one heck of a colonnaded onion dome!

Quite similar to this one at the Pena National Palace in Sintra, Portugal.

Next, the alignment enters the State of Rhode Island.

I read where “Rhode Island” was named for the ancient Greek “Island of Rhodes,” the largest of the Dodecanese Islands in the Aegean Sea pictured here, when Giovanni da Verrazzano likened an island near the mouth of Narragansett Bay to the Island of Rhodes in 1524.

This is the City Gate of the Island of Rhodes, which interestingly, as seen with the statues here, has the same stag symbolism with which Hartford is associated.

In Rhode Island, the alignment crosses over the Scituate watershed and reservoir system. It has six tributary reservoirs, which provide the drinking water for 60% of the state’s population.

This massive public works construction project was said to have gotten underway in about 1915, and was completed by 1925. Interesting to see the low-tech-looking equipment for the project pictured here in 1921, according to the date at the bottom right…

…that we are told was being used to build this…

…this…

…and this. On top of that, World War I was happening at the beginning of that time period.

Next on the alignment is Providence, the capital and largest city of Rhode Island.

It is situated in the mouth of the canal-like Providence River…

…and the head of the Narragansett Bay.

This is the Castle Hill lighthouse in Narragansett Bay…

…and the Pomham Rocks Lighthouse, said to have been built in 1871, and located three-miles from downtown Providence.

South of Providence, at the town of Narragansett, we find the Towers, said to have been built in the 1880’s as a casino. It is also known as the “Twin Towers.”

For comparison, here are the Navesink Twin Lights in northern New Jersey in the Lower New York Bay. Navesink was the name of the Lenni Lenape people who lived there.

The Narragansett people are an Algonquin people of Rhode Island. Here is an historic photo of the Narragansett.

Roger Williams, a religious exile from the Massachusetts Bay Colony & Baptist theologian is given credit in this historical narrative for the founding of Providence in 1636.

This is the outside of the Providence City Hall, said to have been built in 1878…

…and the inside of Providence City Hall.

This is the historic Market House in Providence, which was said to have been designed by Declaration of Independence signer Stephen Hopkins, and local architect Joseph Brown, and built in 1775. It was a meeting place for city business until the construction of the City Hall.

Waterplace Park is an urban park in downtown Providence, situated on the Woonasquatucket River.

Interesting to note is the presence of megalithic masonry at Waterplace Park, which is said to have been finished in 1994.

The meaning of megalith is a large stone used in construction, typically associated with Peru and Egypt, but actually found everywhere around the world. Here is another megalithic wall at Waterplace Park.

And in this view from the water at Waterplace Park…

…I detect earthwork activity here off to the side of the building in the foreground…

…like what you see at Mount Clare in Baltimore, Maryland…

…and the Akureyrikirkja, or church, in Akureyri, Iceland.

Lastly, the oldest shopping mall in America is in Providence. It is called The Arcade Providence, and is described as Greek Revival architecture said to have been built in 1828.

This is a historical depiction of the inside of The Arcade…

…and The Arcade in the present day.

I am going to here, and pick up the alignment in Massachusetts in the next post.

Circle Alignments on the Planet Washington, DC – Part 6 The Lower Hudson River in New York City and New Jersey

I am spending several posts in this part of the world because it is on the alignment, and there is so much to see. I am only scratching the surface of what is here.

I would like to highlight some places in New York City on the east-side of the Hudson River, and New Jersey on the west-side.

This is a view of the Manhattan Bridge in a part of Brooklyn referred to by the syllabic abbreviation of DUMBO, which stands for “Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass.”

You can see the Empire State Building in the center of the bridge’s structural supports.

This happening was not a coincidental or random occurrence.

The Master Builders of the world were Master Engineers, Master Mathematicians & Geometricians, Master Astronomers, Master Hydrologists, so on. They knew what they were doing, and they knew where they were on the planet related to everywhere else.

Compare the perfectly proportioned geometric symmetry of the architecture in Banda Aceh in Indonesia on the left (before it was destroyed on December 26th of 2004 in what is called the Boxing Day Tsunami); with the architecture in Oxford, England in the middle; and that of the Palace of the Kings of Majorca on the right in Perpignan, France.

Another example of this is Manhattanhenge, an annual event during which the setting sun or the rising sun is aligned with the East-West street grid of Manhattan on dates evenly spaced around the summer solstice and winter solstice. 

There are similar alignments with the sun and street plan that occur in other major cities, like Toronto, Baltimore, Chicago, and Montreal. 

This is the historic Stone Street in the Financial District in Lower Manhattan…

…compared with the Casbah in Old Algiers in Algeria…

…the city of Cusco in Peru…

…and the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Just north of the Financial Districts on the Hudson River, Piers 25 & 26 are part of the the Hudson River Park, a park that is part of the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway that extends from 59th Street South to Battery Park.

Pier 25 has recreational facilities, and Pier 26 has an ecological education and research center.

These two piers are part of the TriBeCa section of the Hudson River Park.

The name TriBeCa is also a syllabic abbreviation, of “Triangle Below Canal Street,” though it is actually a trapezoid bounded by Canal Street, West Street, Broadway, and Chambers Street.

TriBeCa is one of Manhattan’s most desirable and fashionable neighborhoods, and its most expensive.

I have put side-by-side comparisons of this building on the top left in TriBeCa, with a building in Chongjin, a port city in North Korea on the top right; and on the bottom left is the Wako Department Store in the Ginza Shopping District of Tokyo; and the same style of building on the bottom right is in Glasgow, Scotland.

In these next examples are comparisons of design elements in TriBeCa on the top left; the Town Hall of Augsburg Germany on the top right; the Town Hall of Bradford-on-Avon in southern England on the bottom left; and the Moscow State Historical Museum in Russia on the bottom right.

And here is a comparison of examples historic fire departments, with the one in TriBeCa on the left, which has a similar look to this fire department in Los Angeles, all the way across the United States from New York City in the middle; and on the right, the Birmingham fire department in England across the North Atlantic Ocean.

These are just a few examples of essentially the same style for historic fire stations across countries and continents.

Times Square is the next place of interest I am going to look at in Manhattan, a major commercial intersection, destination for tourism, entertainment center, and residential neighborhood.

Here is a comparison of Times Square circa 1900, and Times Square of 2012…

…and a historic view of Times Square in earlier days, with arrows pointing towards onion domes…

…and a presumably more recent historic photo depicting the heavy corporate presence here.

Here is a comparison of a street-corner in Times Square on the top, and a street-corner in Madrid, Spain, on the bottom, like the lay-out was based on the same street-plan.

Spain is the only country, outside of North Africa, that the Moors are openly acknowledged to have been.

Next is Central Park, the most visited urban park in the United States. It was designated as a United States Historic Landmark in 1963, and was placed on the UNESCO World Heritage Site tentative in 2017.

Here is a map of the whole of the Central Park map, which I will review here from the bottom to the top.

This is the 59th Street schist bridge, the Gapstow Bridge on 59th Street at The Pond, said to be the second bridge built here.

For comparison to the Gapstow bridge, this is a stone bridge in the Peak District National Park in Sheffield, England.

While not identical in construction style, very similar in the peaceful effect and reflection in the water.

This is a view of the lake section of Central Park on the left, with a comparison of one of the bridges of the River Aire in Leeds, England.

Next on the map of Central Park is the Great Lawn Circle, which was said to have been a “Hooverville” site for people made homeless during the Great Depression, and then a Works Project Administration (WPA) Project, hence the ball fields. It is the center of Central Park…

…and looks like the Ellipse in front of the White House, which is the center of Washington, DC.

I wonder if the Great Lawn is center to more than Central Park….

Belvedere Castle sits in the southwestern section of the Great Lawn, and is one of many examples of castles in North America. Castles are all over the place, but because they weren’t supposed to be here, we don’t question the narrative.

In the foreground of this picture you see ancient stone work; in the middle Belvedere Castle; and in the background you have a building that looks like a Moorish architectural style.

I don’t believe the castle was built in 1869 as we are told, and it’s also being called a “Folly,” which is defined as a decorative building that doesn’t serve much of a purpose, even if it is meant to look like it does.

Something is being covered up!

Along these same lines is the monumental architecture of the Metropolitan Museum of Art on 5th Avenue, adjacent to Central Park and the Great Lawn.

I mean, we don’t even question how this could have possibly built this for its 1880 opening with the history we have been taught. This is huge, heavy masonry and a colossal engineering feat!

By the way, behind the Museum of Art in the Greywacke Knoll is the location of the third obelisk nicknamed “Cleopatra’s Needle,” along with one in London, and another in Paris, and was said to have been given to the United States in 1879.

The 71-foot, or 22-foot, and 244-ton, or 221 metric ton, obelisk was said to have been shipped from Egypt to Upper New York Harbor…

…and that it took 112-days, or almost 4 months, to move the obelisk from the banks of the Hudson River to its present location. The mode of transportation is described as laborers inching the obelisk on parallel beams aided by roll-boxes and a pile-driver engine.

What is harder to believe ~ that it was shipped, and moved as described, or that it was already there?

The Museum of Natural History is on the other side Central Park, between The Lake and the Great Lawn on 81st Street.

Same idea as the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Amazing architecture!

Makes me wonder about the size of the builders of these places.

Ever wonder about the name of Giants for a New York football franchise?

And giant bones and skulls are frequently uncovered around the world in spite of continuous efforts to make them go away.

Next in Central Park is the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, said to be a decommissioned reservoir built between 1852 and 1862 (the Civil War took place between 1861 – 1865)…

…to receive water from the Old Croton Aqueduct.

The Old Croton Aqueduct, said to have been built between 1837 and 1842, originates in Croton in Westchester County, and is 41-miles, or 227- kilometers, long.

This is the High Bridge of the Croton Aqueduct, which crosses over the Harlem River, on its way to Central Park…

…which reminded me of the Ribblehead Viaduct in the Yorkshire Dales National Park in northern England, said to have been built for the railroad between 1869 and 1874.

Again, how could they have accomplished these kind of engineering feats in a time period we are taught was low technology?

The last place in Central Park I want to look at is called Harlem Meer, or Harlem Lake.

This rocky formation at Harlem Meer is called a bluff, which is one of the code-words used to cover up ancient infrastructure.

Harlem Meer in Central Park is adjacent to Harlem, in Upper Manhattan.

This is the Ascension Presbyterian Church in the Mount Morris Park Historic District in East Harlem, with its impressive architecture…

…and a historic photo of the Mount Morris Bank Building.

And this is a building in Harlem on the top left, compared with a building in Madrid, Spain on the top right, and one in Andijan, Uzbekhistan on the bottom.

While not identical, the three buildings in very different places share the same rounded building-corner, and angles of lay-out on their respective street corners.

I have found countless identical street-corner configurations like these, and similar to these, all over the world.

Next, I will take a look at some places on the other side of the Lower Hudson River, in New Jersey.

The first place is Cliffside Park, a borough in Bergen County located on top of the Hudson River Palisades…

…and the home of the Palisades Amusement Park, along with the adjacent community of Fort Lee, and one of the most-visited amusement parks in the country from 1898 until its closure in 1971.

While four high-rise luxury apartments now stand where the amusement park was located, there still old stone ruins on the former park’s grounds.

This modern home in Cliffside Park sure has a megalithic-looking stone wall beside it.

Here is an historic photo of the First Baptist Church of Cliffside Park…

…compared with a similar feature at Neuschwanstein Castle in Bavaria in Germany…

…and the same idea at the Dalian Castle in Dalian, China.

This apartment building in Cliffside Park has an interesting stone wall going on…

…and this Cliffside Park apartment building is quite ornate and elegant.

Just a short distance up the Hudson River from Cliffside Park is another city on top of the Palisades, Fort Lee, and the western terminus of the George Washington Bridge crossing over into the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan.

The Fort Lee Historic Park surrounds the base of the bridge.

There are some interesting contrasts going on here.

This wooden structure is on the Fort Lee Historic Park grounds…

…as well as these huge cut-and-shaped-looking stones lining the Hudson River bank. There’s a nice view of the Hudson Palisades in the background.

The Fort Lee Historic Park is part of the Palisades Interstate Park…

…and the Palisades Interstate Park was created in 1900, in a response to the destruction of the Palisades by quarry operators in the late 19th-century.

These are photos taken on the Shore Trail at Closter, New Jersey…

…that leads to what are called the Giant Stairs.

Here is a view of the Palisades from the Hudson River…

…compared with the Lena River Pillars near Yakutsk in Far Eastern Siberia…

…and the Miles Canyon Basalts on the Yukon River, near Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory.

A few thoughts to provide an explanation for what I have found throughout New York and New Jersey in this post, and previous ones.

I am reminded of the last scene from the original “Planet of the Apes” movie, when Charlton Heston realized for the first time in the movie where he actually was the whole time, only in the sense that we do not know where we really are. We are living and working in, and on top of, the infrastructure of an advanced, ancient civilization, without knowing it.

This knowledge has been deliberately removed from our collective memory and awareness.

Who were the Lenni Lenape people, who lived throughout this region before what we are taught was the coming of Europeans?

There is agreement this was their land, and they are described hunter-gatherers, with farming as well. There is just not much written information to find out about the Lenni Lenape.

The wisdom keepers of this ancient civilization that was not only in North America, but around the world…

… know who they really were, as shown in the northeastern part of this map.

The Lenni Lenape people were Moors.

According to George G. M. James in his book “Stolen Legacy”…

… the Moors were the custodians of the Ancient Egyptian mysteries, and they still are.

…and this is the Great Seal of the Moors.

The beauty, harmony, and balance of the global Moorish Civilization, from Antiquity, was replaced by a parasitic system, causing human and environmental degradation…relatively recently.

Now is the time of the Awakening, and claiming the original positive Moorish, and higher, timeline and legacy for Humanity.

I will be picking up the circle alignment in Hartford, Connecticut in the next post.

Circle Alignments on the Planet Washington, DC – Part 5 Upper New York Bay

To this point, I have tracked the circle alignment from Washington, DC; through Baltimore, Maryland; Wilmington, Delaware;Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Morrisville, Pennsylvania; Trenton, New Jersey; Sayreville, New Jersey; and the Lower New York Bay.

In this post, I am going to only focus on the Upper New York Bay.

Upper New York Bay, also called the New York Harbor, is the traditional heart of the Port of New York and New Jersey.

It is said to be fed by the waters of the Hudson River, coming into the bay between Liberty State Park in New Jersey, and Lower Manhattan.

Upper New York Bay provides passage for the Hudson River via the Anchorage Channel, which is fifty-feet deep, or 15 meters, through the mid-point of the harbor. It is one of the most heavily-used water transportation arteries in the world.

The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn is connected to the Gowanus Bay of Upper New York Bay. Brooklyn occupies the westernmost part of Long Island. At one time a vital transportation hub, it is now a superfund site due to extensive pollution, with clean-up efforts starting in 2013.

The Upper New York Bay is connected to the Lower New York Bay by the Narrows, described as the tidal strait separating the Boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn, and forms the principal channel by which the Hudson River empties into the Atlantic Ocean.

Upper New York Bay is connected to Long Island Sound via the East River. The East River separates Manhattan Island from Brooklyn and Queens, and connects with the Hudson River via the Harlem River at the northern end of Manhattan Island.

The East River is known as the “River of Mighty Bridges,” the best known being the Brooklyn Bridge, a suspension bridge opened in 1883…

…and for comparison is the Sidi M’Cid Bridge, a suspension bridge in Constantine, Algeria said to have opened in 1912. Constantine is referred to as “The City of Bridges.”

Upper New York Bay is connected to the Newark Bay by the Kill Van Kull, what is called a tidal strait between Staten Island, New York, and Bayonne, New Jersey.

The Robbins Reef Lighthouse, no longer in use, stands at the eastern end of the Kill Van Kull. The current lighthouse building was said to have been built in 1883, replacing an octagonal granite tower that was said to have been built in 1839.

At one time, Robbins Reef was said to have one of the largest oyster beds in the world until they were completely contaminated by the end of the 19th-century.

Robbins Reef is located off of Constable Hook in Bayonne, New Jersey. This is the Bayonne Country Club on Constable Hook, complete with its own lighthouse.

I firmly believe golf courses cover-up mound sites.

Bergen Point marks the western end of the Kill Van Kull. This geometrically-shaped point-of-land at one time was at one time the location of a Texaco plant…

…and Bergen Point Lighthouse was nearby in Newark Bay, until we are told it was torn down around 1950.

There are some real inconsistencies in information I read here on the Bergen Point Lighthouse. It was said to have been built in 1849, and already have fallen into disrepair by 1855. As early as 1853, only four years after the given construction date, Major Fraser of the Corps of Engineers, was describing its state as already precarious.

The Bergen Point Lighthouse, with its beautiful masonry, does not look badly built in this picture!

Here is another date inconsistency associated with Bergen Point, concerning the nearby Point Johnston Coal Docks as well.

They were said to have been built in 1864 by the Central Railroad of New Jersey.

What is wrong with that date?

It means that a big infrastructure project like this would have been undertaken during the American Civil War, and an especially intense year at that.

Liberty State Park opened in the Bicentennial Year of 1976, and is located at the mouth of the Hudson River on the New Jersey-side in Jersey City.

It is situated opposite of both Liberty Island, where the Statue of Liberty is located, and Ellis Island, the gateway for immigration between 1892 and 1954. More on these two islands shortly.

The northeastern side of Liberty State Park is bordered by both the Little Basin…

…and the Big Basin of the Morris Canal.

The Morris Canal, 107-miles, or 172-kilometers, long, said to have been completed in 1832 to carry coal across northern New Jersey between the Delaware River and the Hudson River. It was closed in 1924. It was hailed as an ingenious, technological marvel for its use of water-driven, inclined planes.


…with water from the canal coming from Lake Hopatcong, which was dammed in the building of the canal, filling the surrounding landscape with water.

This was a home at Lake Hopatcong, said to have been built in 1895 with imported stones.

The builders of the Morris Canal used a sophisticated power house technology, pictured here, to power the water turbine that was set in motion to raise or lower cradled boats on the inclined planes by means of a cable.

You mean to tell me all of this extremely sophisticated and advanced canal-engineering technology was being implemented prior to the beginning of the Industrial Age, according to the history we are taught.

Seriously?

And, by the way, mules were still needed to be used to pull the canal boats in places on the Morris Canal in spite of all that technology?

Food for thought about the difference between what we are told, and what does not hold up under scrutiny.

One building I want to show you back in Jersey City is the Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theater, said to have opened in 1929. It is lavish on the outside…

…and lavish on the inside.

Preservationists succeeded in saving the building from demolition after it closed in 1986. It is used for special events, and is the primary venue of the annual Golden Door Film Festival since 2011.

One more thing before I leave Liberty State Park and Jersey City. This building is the Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal. It was the waterfront passenger terminal in Jersey City.

An estimated 10.5 million immigrants processed through here to get to Ellis Island.

The architectural style of the Terminal building is called Richardsonian Romanesque, after architect Henry Hobson Richardson, who first used elements of this style in the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane in Buffalo, New York, which he is said to have designed in 1870. It is now known as the Richardson Olmstead Complex.

Richardsonian Romanesque is described as a free revival style, incorporating 11th and 12th century southern French, Spanish, Italian Romanesque characteristics.

He had a relatively short career, having died at age 47, and didn’t even complete his architecture school training in Paris because he lost family backing because of the American Civil War.

Among other places, Richardson is also given the credit for designing Trinity Church in Boston.

Like I mentioned previously, Liberty State Park in New Jersey is close to Liberty Island and Ellis Island in the Upper New York Bay.

Liberty Island is described as an exclave of the New York City Borough of Manhattan, as it is in New Jersey waters. It was known as Bedloe’s Island until it was renamed Liberty Island by an Act of Congress in 1956.

Fort Wood, the eleven-pointed star fort the Statue of Liberty sits on top of, was said to have been built between 1806 and 1811…

…and the pedestal in 1886 to receive the Statue of Liberty as a gift from France commemorating the American Centennial of 1876.

And no where is it mentioned that Liberty Island is an artificial island…

…and it is even more obvious that Ellis Island located right next to it is an artificial island, with its geometric shapes.

…even though it is not called one either. It is said to have been largely created through land reclamation though. Hmmm.

This is an aerial of the north side of Ellis Island from Google Earth showing a circular feature on the grounds…

…and this is the street view of that same feature from Google Earth, with a mound-like appearance inside the circle.

Prior to when the current facilities are said to have been, Ellis Island was the location of Fort Gibson, one of forty forts said to have been built as part of the the New York Harbor System between 1794 – 1812. This marker commemorates Fort Gibson…

…on what became known as Ellis Island.

Co-Architects William Alciphron Boring and Edward Lippencott Tilton are given the credit for the architecture seen here today dating from the late 1800s to 1900, and which is currently the museum for Ellis Island.

It is said to be what is called Renaissance Revival architecture.

Ellis Island has been owned by the United States government since 1808, and has been operated by the National Park Service since 1965.

The south-side of the island, which houses the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, has been closed to the public since 1954.

Governors Island is also in the the Upper New York Bay, and situated at the confluence of the East River and the Hudson River.

It is 800 yards, or 732 meters, from the southern tip of Manhattan Island, and separated from Brooklyn by the Buttermilk Channel by approximately 400 yards or 366 meters.

The first thing that caught my eye when I was looking at Governors Island on Google Earth was Fort Jay, named after Supreme Court Chief Justice & Founding Father John Jay, and part of the Governors Island National Monument…

…said to have been built in 1794 to defend Upper New York Bay, and an active installation until 1997.

Another feature of the Governors Island National Monument is Castle Williams, part of the New York Harbor System defenses. It is called a circular structure of red sandstone, having been built between 1807 and 1811 under the direction of Lt. Colonel Jonathan Williams of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers.

A few other places of interest on Governors Island that I found on Google Earth include “The Hills…”

…which, according to this streetview of The Hills at the same location on Google Earth, are no longer there….

This brings me to Battery Park, at the southern tip of Manhattan, the historical location of another star fort, Fort Amsterdam, said to have been surrendered by the Dutch to the British in 1664…

…and Castle Clinton, a circular fort said to have been built of red sandstone between 1808 and 1811, and the first immigration center of the United States before Ellis Island, between 1855 and 1890.

Castle Clinton was also known as the “West Battery,” a complement to Castle Williams as the “East Battery” on Governors Island. More on the use of the word battery shortly.

So far, since I have been looking at the Lower and Upper New York Bays, I can make a case for finding seven star forts. I am not including Fort Gibson on Ellis Island because if there was a star fort there, it is long gone or covered over:

–Fort Hancock on Sandy Hook at the Atlantic Ocean entrance to the Lower New York Bay was a star fort at one time

–Fort Tilden on the Rockaway Peninsula in the Lower New York Bay, north of Fort Hancock and Sandy Hook. It is hard to tell what is here because of the tree cover, but you can make some points out here in this photo

Here is another location on the Fort Tilden site…

…and a similar feature beside it further up the embankment.

–Fort Wadsworth, also known as Battery Weed, located next to the Staten Island side of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, located at The Narrows between the Lower and Upper New York Bays

–Fort Hamilton at the base of the Brooklyn-side of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, where you can see a geometric earthwork point in this photo

–Fort Wood in the Upper New York Bay underneath the Statue of Liberty

–Fort Jay on Governors Island at the convergence of the Hudson and East Rivers

–Fort Amsterdam on what is now called Battery Park.

What are the meanings of “battery?”

One is “a device that produces electricity; may have several primary or secondary cells arranged in parallel or series.”

Another is “the heavy fire of artillery to saturate an area rather than hit a specific target.”

Or ” An assault in which the assailant makes physical contact.”

The answer to the mystery of star forts, which are found all around the planet, lies in what I believe is the first answer – that some how these star forts functioned as batteries, for the purpose of producing electricity or some form of energy for the planetary grid system, but they were re-purposed in many cases, but not all, to the second definition in another time-line to have a military function.

I will have more to say to tie all of this information together in the next post, when I pick up the alignment going up the Hudson River.

Circle Alignments on the Planet Washington, DC – Part 4 Sayreville, New Jersey to Bay Ridge, Brooklyn

In the last post, I took a close look at Morrisville Borough in Pennsylvania on one side of the Delaware River, and Trenton, New Jersey, the capital of New Jersey, directly across from Morrisville on the other side of the River.

The starting point on the circle alignment for this post is Sayreville, a borough in New Jersey located in Middlesex County New Jersey…

… near the Raritan Bay…

…at the Raritan River, long a transportation and trade route pre-dating colonial times. This S-shaped river bend at Sayreville…

…compared with the S-shaped river bend shown here in the Ukok National Park in the Altai Mountains of Central Asia…

…the Big Bend of the Rio Grande River in South Texas…

…and the Horseshoe Bend of the Colorado River near Page, Arizona.

Charles Morgan III and the Morgan Clan were said to have arrived from New York in the early 1700s to settle the 645-acres granted to them by New Jersey’s first proprietors, John, Lord Berkeley of Stratton and Sir George Carteret. This land became known as the Morgan section of Sayreville.

Members of the Morgan family were the proprietors of the Morgan Inn, which was established sometime around this same time in 1703. The Morgan Inn later became somewhat known infamous as the Old Spye Inn, as this place saw a lot of activity during the Revolutionary War.


It was believed to be haunted, and the Old Spye Inn burned down in 1976.

The Welsh pirate Henry Morgan was mentioned as having a possible connection to these New Jersey Morgans, but the dates didn’t check out when I looked into it. Henry Morgan was said to have died in 1688, so he could never have gone to the Inn as he was purported to have done on occasion.

However, I will take this opportunity to mention that Henry Morgan was given the credit historically for the sacking of star Fort San Lorenzo in Chagres, Panama, near Colon, in 1670…

…and the sacking and destruction of Old Panama City the following year in 1671.

Old Panama City before, with a star fort depicted in this diorama here…

Old Panama City after, without a star fort left standing….

You know, the Captain Morgan’s Rum Captain Morgan. Exactly the same historical character.

Sayreville received its final naming from James Sayre, Jr, of Newark, one of the two co-founders of the Sayre and Fisher Brick Company in 1850.

There are extensive clay deposits in the area, and the Sayre and Fisher Company quickly became one of the largest brick-making companies in the world.

Big companies including, but not limited to, DuPont established plants in Sayreville for gunpowder production initially in 1898, and later for paint and photo products.

The Raritan River Railroad operated freight and passenger service through here between 1888 and 1980, after which time Conrail took over rail operations.

This the logo for the Raritan River Railroad…

…and this is the logo for Rolls Royce.

The similarity between these two logos tells me these two companies were connected in some way. Besides the fact the logos look virtually identical, it brings to mind what I found in Derby, England.

I found Derby near the Algiers’ Circle Alignment as I was tracking it through England in the last series. Derby is the geographic center of England, and the Derwent River Valley in Derbyshire is considered the Birthplace of the Industrial Revolution.

Rolls-Royce is a global aerospace, defense, energy, and marine company focused on world-class power and propulsion systems, and its civil aerospace and nuclear divisions are in Derby…

…as well as the Railway Technical Center, the technical headquarters of British Rail, and considered the largest railway research complex in the world…

…and Derby is the location of Bombardier Transportation, the rail equipment division of the Canadian company Bombardier, and for many years the United Kingdom’s only train manufacturer.

There are certainly interconnecting pieces of the puzzle to be found lying around these tidbits of otherwise disconnected information.

Back to Sayresville. The extensive clay deposits here include the Crossman Clay pit…

… having gained recognition as a premiere source for amber, as well as pyrite and a diversity of fossils.

The John F. Kennedy Memorial Park is adjacent to the Crossman Clay pit.

Look at all the swans and koi fish here at the park! And pay no attention the man-made water’s edge….

Moving on from Sayreville, the alignment enters the Raritan Bay, which has a number of places at which to look.

I am going to start by looking at the Navesink Twin Lights, next to a long and narrow land feature called Sandy Hook Island. While these two places are a distance east off of this particular alignment, they are both noteworthy.

The Navesink Twin Lights are on the headlands of the Navesink Highlands, overlooking Sandy Hook Bay, the entrance to the New York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean.

Navesink was also the name of the Lenni Lenape people who inhabited the Raritan Bayshore near Sandy Hook, and Mount Mitchill in the scenic highlands in eastern New Jersey.

We are told, however, that the Twin LIghts were built in 1862.

The American Civil War is said to have taken place between 1861 to 1865, so we are expected to believe this solid masonry structure was built during war-time, and we will keep seeing similar attributions given to many structures.

Sandy Hook is described as a barrier spit in Middletown Township, which is located in Monmouth County, New Jersey.

It is 6-miles, or 10-kilometers long, and at its widest, 1-mile, or 2-kilometers, across. It encloses the southern entrance of the New York Bay, and provides protection from the open waters of the Atlantic to the East.

Fort Hancock, and the Sandy Hook Lighthouse, is located at the northern end of Sandy Hook.

The lighthouse on Sandy Hook at Fort Hancock is said to be the oldest working lighthouse in the United States, and we are told it was  built in 1764.

The construction of the Fort of Sandy Hook was said to have started in 1857 and ended in 1867, without completing the building of the fort under the supervision of then-Captain Robert E. Lee of the Corps of Engineers, and was designed as a five-bastion irregular pentagon (describing a star fort perhaps?), built primarily of granite (which rates as 7 – 9 on the Mohs scale of relative hardness to other minerals scale).

Not only was the fort said not to have been completed, it was also said to have had most of its surviving parts taken down by the U. S. Army after World War II.

The batteries of the now designated Fort Hancock were said to have been constructed starting in 1890 as part of the Sandy Hook Proving Ground for the testing of coastal defensive weapons, like Battery Potter.

Battery Potter is described as the prototype for a steam-hydraulic, gun-lift carriages, otherwise known as “disappearing guns.”

Fort Hancock is said to have become inactive in 1974, and is now part of the National Parks of New York Harbor, and the Gateway Recreation Area, under the National Park System.

Just north of Sandy Hook is the Ambrose Channel, the main shipping channel in and out of the Port of New York and New Jersey.

On the other side of the Ambrose Channel from Fort Hancock on Sandy Hook is Fort Tilden on the Rockaway Peninsula in New York, a now abandoned Army installation that was said to have been built in 1917, and in use until 1995. It is now part of the Gateway National Recreation Area, and administered by the National Park Service, like Fort Hancock.

Now back to Raritan Bay, where the Great Beds Lighthouse is on the alignment I am tracking, just offshore from the northwestern New Jersey coast, located at the Great Beds Shoal near the mouth of the Raritan River. It was said to have been built in 1880, and manned until 1945.

The Old Orchard Lighthouse is said to have been built in 1883, and is three-miles south of the center of Staten Island.

This is the West Bank Lighthouse, which serves as the front-range light for the Ambrose Channel, which is used in navigation to indicate safe passage, or position fixing. It was said to have been built in 1901.

The Staten Island Lighthouse is on Richmond Hill is the rear-range light for the Ambrose Channel, a 90-ft-high, or 27-meter, tower said to have been built in 1912, and is 141-feet, or 43-meters, above sea-level.

This is the Coney Island Lighthouse on the western end of Coney Island, in Seagate, and situated east of the Ambrose Channel of New York Harbor. It was said to have been built in 1890.

The Romer Shoal Lighthouse is situated between the ship channels of Ambrose, Swash, and Sandy Hook, and is approximately 3-miles, or 5- kilometers, north of the Sandy Hook Lighthouse. It was badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was said to have been built in 1838.

My personal position after 3-years of intensive study of this subject is that the lighthouses around the world were built by the maritime Ancient Advanced Civilization that has been removed from our collective awareness.

This alignment tracks very close to, if not directly over, Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island.

It is described as a former United States Military Installation on Staten Island, situated on The Narrows, which divides New York Bay into upper and lower halves, said to have been established before the War of 1812, as well as between 1845- 1861. I could not find clear reference dates on its construction.

…and a natural defense point for the Upper Bay of Manhattan and beyond.

This sturdy structure was closed in 1994, and is now also administered by the National Park Service’s Gateway National Recreation Area.

On the southern side of the other end of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge from Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island is Fort Hamilton in Brooklyn. Fort Hamilton is an active United States Army installation.

This is the Fort Hamilton Community Club…

…the high school for the community of Fort Hamilton…

…the historic Fortway Theater of Fort Hamilton, which was said to have opened in 1927, and closed in 2005, to become a supermarket in 2007…

…and Fort Hamilton community real estate for sale.

John Paul Jones Park, named for the Naval hero of the American Revolution, is on the northern side of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, with its cannon…

…and obelisk.

The rest of the southwest corner of Brooklyn is the neighborhood of Bay Ridge.

This was Bliss Castle on the Bliss Estate, said to have been built by the wealthy manufacturer Eliphalet Bliss…

…and after he died, his will stipulated it could be sold to New York City at less than market prices if it was used as park land.

So his former estate became first Bliss Park, and then later Owl’s Head Park, and all of the original infrastructure on it has long-been removed, having been demolished in 1940.

This is the Union Church of Bay Ridge, with cornerstones said to have been laid in 1896 for two church congregations, one Presbyterian and the other Dutch Reformed, with its beautiful heavy masonry…

…and this was the historic Crescent Athletic Club Boathouse in Bay Ridge. It burned down in 1904.

I will pick up the alignment in Upper New York Bay in the next post.

Circle Alignments on the Planet Washington, DC – Part 3 Morrisville Borough, Pennsylvania to Trenton, New Jersey

So far, this circle alignment has been tracked through the metropolitan areas of Washington, DC; Baltimore, Maryland; Wilmington, Delaware; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Next on the alignment, we come to Morrisville, a borough in Bucks County, located just below the Delaware River Falls, opposite the Delaware River from Trenton, New Jersey.

In the State of Pennsylvania, a borough is considered a self-governing municipal entity, best thought of as a town, and usually smaller than a city, but with fewer powers and responsibilities than full-fledged cities.

Pretty close to sounding like the word Moorish…think that might be a stretch? Let’s take a look at this more closely.

We are told Morrisville was named after Robert Morris, an English-born merchant and Founding Father. He was a businessman turned politician, and is best known for being the Financier of the American Revolution. He campaigned unsuccessfully for Morrisville to become the new Nation’s Capital.

This is a portrait of him painted by Charles Willson Peale in 1782, originally hung in Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

I wonder what he is holding in his right hand…and interesting that there is a view of a classical-looking building through the window he is sitting next to. In the United States in 1782?

When I looked up the Coat-of-Arms of Robert Morris, Founding Father, this is what I found:

I looked up the Morris Coat-of-Arms, and while there are several versions, this is one of them…

…compared with the flag of Sardinia, a large island in the Mediterranean off the coast of Italy, which is nicknamed the Four Moors flag…

…and the flag of Corsica, an island just north of Sardinia in the Mediterranean Sea.

Then there are Morris Dancers in England, who practice a group dance form of choreographed steps, with bells on the knees, and wielding sticks, swords, or handkerchiefs.

It is said the name of Morris Dance is first recorded in the 15th-century as Moorish Dance. Here is a 1480 statue of a Moorish Dancer at the Old Townhall in Munich.

Graystones in Morrisville is where William Penn is said to have purchased the first Pennsylvania land in 1682 from the Lenni Lenape…

…and here is the massive gray stone at the top of the land purchase on Crown Street in Morrisville, to the left of that historical marker.

It is interesting to note that both of these important men in the historical narrative, Wllliam Penn and Robert Morris, are said to have ended up in debtor’s prison before they died because of financial problems.

The Lincoln Highway, the one of the nation’s earliest transcontinental highways, goes through Morrisville.

The Lincoln Highway starts in Times Square in New York City, and ends up in Lincoln Park in San Francisco. It is said to have opened in 1913.

The Calhoun Street Toll Supported Bridge is between Morrisville and Trenton. It was said to have been constructed in 1884 by the Phoenix Bridge Company.

This bridge helps connect segments of the 3,000-mile-long East Coast Greenway, which runs from Calais, Maine, to Key West, Florida.

The Calhoun Street Bridge was part of the Lincoln Highway until 1920, at which time the Lincoln Highway was re-routed to the toll-free Lower Trenton Bridge.

A portion of the Delaware Canal State Park is in Morrisville.

The canal that runs through Morrisville was said to have been built in the 1830s between Easton to the North and Bristol to the South…

…and a crushed-stone towpath, upon which mules pulled cargo-laden boats.

So, somehow the technology existed in the 1830s to build a sophisticated canal system, and they had the ability to crush stone into tiny, tiny pieces, but that the boats themselves had to be pulled by mules?

This is certainly what we are taught, but does this make sense?

I checked out Core Creek Park in Morrisville because I always find things in parks, and sure enough, it has a folly…

…that is similar to the one in Nemours Gardens in Wilmington, Delaware.

Robert Morris lived at Summerseat in Morrisville. Note the windows going underground, like there is more of this building below the ground…

…and which was a busy place during the American Revolutionary War…

Morrisville is where Washington established his camp in the winter of the famous crossing of the Delaware River, and where the British Garrison in Trenton was defeated, marking a turning point in the war in favor of the American forces.

So this brings us to Trenton, the capital of New Jersey, and briefly the U. S. Capital in 1784.

The New Jersey State Capitol Building is just right across the Delaware River from Morrisville, said to have been built in 1790, and the oldest state house in continuous legislative use in the United States. Built 7 years after the end of the Revolutionary War in 1783?

How? We can’t build like this even today.

And the beginning of the Industrial Revolution wasn’t said to have really gotten underway in the United States until approximately the mid-1800s.

There were a number of mills in Trenton, New Jersey.

The paper mill on Assunpink Creek in Trenton was already described as old in the 1870s. With the guy in the top hat standing in the mid-ground; the two guys underneath the bridge in the background; the group of four on the bridge itself; and with no other activity going on, this photo seems really odd to me. What were they doing there?

Assunpink Creek was also the location of the Second Battle of Trenton between British and American forces on January 2nd, 1777, which the Americans won.

Here are structures of the Assunpink Creek today.

Nothing out-of-the-ordinary to see here, right?

Here is a close-up of the foundation of the building, showing what appears to be large blocks of masonry.

This building in Trenton was the Exton Mill on the left, compared with the design features of what is called an old church at the abandoned settlement of Ushakovskoye, on Wrangel Island on the East Siberian Sea in the middle; and that of the building in Jerome, Arizona, on the right.

The Delaware and Raritan Canal connects the Delaware River at Bordentown, New Jersey, and the Raritan River at New Brunswick, New Jersey. This a distance of 44 miles, or 71 kilometers.

It goes through Trenton…

…on its way to the New Brunswick Terminus. We are told the canal was built between 1830 and 1834. Again, the sophistication of the engineering of these canals does not match the low technology of the times in which they are said to have been built.

Here is one of the locks on the Delaware and Raritan Canal.


This building is in Trenton’s West End…

…compared with this one in Fort Madison, Iowa…

…and this one in Kherson, Ukraine.

I found this historic photo of the Orpheum Theater on the left side of this street in Trenton.

Orpheum was the name of many theaters at one time, and the root of this goes back to the Greek god Orpheus. He had the ability to charm all living things through his music, which essentially means casting a spell.

Here is a historic photo of the Orpheum Theater in Springfield, Illinois.

This is the Orpheus Statue at Fort McHenry, said to be the winning design by Charles Niehaus in a contest held in 1916 to come up with a monument to commemorate the centennial of the writing of the “Star Spangled Banner” by Francis Scott Key.

This 40-foot statue of Orpheus is said to have been greeting visitors to Fort McHenry in Baltimore since 1922.

Just want to put this out as food for thought as to why Orpheus could possibly be commemorated in ways like these in our relatively recent past.

One last place in New Jersey that I would like to visit before I finish this post are the Kittatinny Mountains. They are roughly 70 miles, or 110-kilometers, north-northwest of Trenton, and slightly northeast of the Delaware River Gap.

This obelisk serves at the High Point Veterans’ Memorial in the Kittatinny Mountains…

…and this is a photo of the Kittatinny Ridge, with some very geometric-looking blocks of stone, and straight-edges seen throughout the blocks of stone pictured.

I will be picking up the alignment in the New York Bay area in the next post.