Circle Alignments on the Planet Amsterdam Island – Part 9 Bonin Islands, Japan to Pohnpei Island, Caroline Islands

The last post travelled along the alignment from Chongjin, a North Korean port, to Yokohama, the most important port in Japan and a major commercial hub for Tokyo. The next place on the alignment is considered part of the Tokyo Metropolitan area for administrative purposes.

I am talking about the Bonin Islands, also known as Ogasawara Islands, are comprised of over 30 tropical and subtropical islands located south of Tokyo. These are volcanic islands are in the Pacific Rim of Fire.

The northern most island group is called Muko-Jima. It is not inhabited. From this aerial view, numerous coves and bays are seen.

Compared with the appearance of the coastline of this island in the Caribbean – the northern 60% of which is governed as a Collectivity of France called St. Martin, and the southern 40% is governed by the Netherlands and called St. Maarten.

The main island group is called Chichi-Jima. It is inhabited, and home to about 2,000 people.

Commodore Perry stopped here on his way to Tokyo Bay to open it up for trade with the west, laid claim to the island for the United States, calling it the U. S. Colony of Peel Island. He appointed a governor for the colony, Nathaniel Savory, whom he purchased land from on Peel Island, for a steamship coaling location in 1853.

But it, along with the other islands, was re-claimed for Japan by the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1862, and named the Ogasawara Islands.

The Tokugawa Shogunate is called the last feudal Japanese Military Government, ruling from 1600 to 1868 from Edo Castle in Tokyo.

Here is a photo of one of the polygonal megalithic walls found on the grounds of Edo Castle…

…compared with this exquisite example of polygonal masonry at the Coricancha in Cusco, Peru. Polygonal masonry is defined as a technique where the visible surfaces of the stone are dressed with straight edges or joints, giving the stone the appearance of a polygon, with minimal clearance between stones, and no mortar.

After World War II, the United States Navy controlled these islands. Almost all of the islanders were expelled. Control was returned to Japan in 1968, at which time islanders were allowed to return.

There is a nicely shaped and protected harbor here at Futami on Chichi-Jima.

Very similar to other harbors around the world, including but not limited to, Funchal Harbor and Marina on the island of Madeira, which is in the Atlantic Ocean southwest of Portugal, and northwest of Morocco…

…Vernazza Harbor on the Italian Riviera in the province of Liguria on Italy’s northwest coast…

…the harbor of Nice, France, which is located in the French Riviera on the southeast coast of France on the Mediterranean Sea…

…and there is even a shaped harbor at Ushuaia, the capital of Tierra del Fuego at the very tip of South America, and which is part of Argentina. Ushuaia is considered the southernmost city in the world. I didn’t know there was even anything down there ~ did you?

Here is a scene showing what I believe to be ancient masonry from Minami-jima, a small island off the southwest coast of Chichi-jima…

…and Kominato Beach on Minami-jima…

…looks like Grama Bay in Albania…

…Myrtos Beach on the Greek island of Kefalonia…

…and Vaja Beach on the island of Korcula in Croatia.

Marine areas within the Bonin Islands are home to significant populations of whales, dolphins, and sea turtles…

…and abundant underwater landscapes of coral reefs filled with tropical fish.

Next on the alignment we come to the Northern Marianas islands, which consists of fourteen islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and is a Commonwealth of the United States. They are one of four major island groups of Micronesia, the name given to a sub-region of Oceania, and which contains four major island groups: the Mariana islands; the Caroline Islands; the Gilbert Islands; and the Marshall Islands.

Guam is the southernmost island of the chain, but a separate U. S. Territory.

Since I am here, I will first take a look at Guam. It is the westernmost point and territory of the U. S. and the largest island of Micronesia.

This is Tumon Bay on Guam, which looks a lot like the beaches and bays shown previously in this post.

This feature at Tumon is called Two Lovers Cliff. There is a legend about it that two forbidden lovers jumped to their deaths so they could be together. Cliff is a cover-up code word for the advanced ancient civilization, and another way they hide things is by creating a distraction to noticing what is actually there.

Of the other Northern Mariana Islands, the vast majority reside on Saipan, Tinian, and Rota. Guam, Saipan and Tinian were sites of major battles in World War II.

This is Mount Marpi on the island of Saipan. It is said to have received its nickname – “Suicide Cliff” – from mass suicides in 1944 of Japanese civilians and soldiers occurred capture by the United States. Again, as with the cliffs at Tumon on Guam, those look like stone walls to me.

These are the House of Taga Latte Stones, an archeological site found on the island of Tinian, said to be the pillars for a house erected by Taga, called a mythological chief who lived in prehistoric times. Reconcile this idea based on what we have been taught about history that stone pillars like this could have been built in prehistoric times. Prehistoric, like Fred Flintstone prehistoric? I don’t think so. This is advanced masonry.

Next on the alignment, we come to Palikir, the capital of the Federated States of Micronesia, and located on the island of Pohnpei, or Ponape. It is described as a high volcanic island with a fringing coral reef. Pohnpei is one of the Caroline Islands.

This is what the city of Palakir looks like. We are told it was a tiny village of little consequence until the Federated States of Micronesia decided to convert it into their capital city which it is said to have officially become in 1989. Nothing suspicious here, right?

I will leave this picture of Cesky Krumlov in the Czech Republic for comparison with the above photo. It is described as one of the Czech Republic’s finest medieval towns, and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Before I move on to the premier feature of Pohnpei, which is Nan Madol, let’s take a look at the three waterfalls on the island. Waterfalls are a signature feature of the worldwide grid.

First, here is a photo of the Liduduhnlap Falls, considered a twin falls which is located outside of the city of Kolonia on the island in a lush, jungle-like setting…

…compared with one of my favorite waterfalls, the Gacnik Waterfalls in the Julian Alps of Slovenia, in particular for its similarity of the upper portion of both waterfalls.

Next, this is Sahwartik Falls, considered the highest falls on the island.

…compared with the Faipi Waterfall in Bangladesh.

And here is a picture of the Keprohi Falls on Pohnpei…

…compared with the Purakaunui Falls in New Zealand.

We can’t visit the island of Pohnpei without looking at Nan Madol, which is located adjacent to the eastern shored of Pohnpei.

There are massive buildings here, built on small rectangular artificial islands, situated on top of a coral reef and linked by canals. It is estimated that 250 million tons of prismatic basalt went into the lincoln-log-like construction of Nan Madol, spread over 170 acres.

There are similar style basalt column constructions on the neighboring island of Kosrae, to the East of Pohnpei…

…like these on Lelu Island on Kosrae.

I am going to end the post here, and pick up the alignment in the next part of the series in Ong Tang Java the Solomon Islands.

Author: Michelle Gibson

I firmly believe there would be no mysteries in history if we had been told the true history. I intend to provide compelling evidence to support this. I have been fascinated by megaliths most of my life, and my journey has led me to uncovering the key to the truth. I found a star tetrahedron on the North American continent by connecting the dots of major cities, and extended the lines out. Then I wrote down the cities that lined lined up primarily in circular fashion, and got an amazing tour of the world of places I had never heard of with remarkable similarities across countries. This whole process, and other pieces of the puzzle that fell into place, brought up information that needs to be brought back into collective awareness.

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