Circle Alignments on the Planet Algiers – Part 11 Inukjuak, Quebec to Tasiilaq, Greenland

The last post ended in the Belcher Islands of the Hudson Bay. I am picking up the alignment on the east-central shore of the Hudson Bay at Inukjuak.

Inukjuak is in the Nord-du-Quebec region of Northern Quebec, on the western side of what is called the Ungava Peninsula, in the Nunavik Administrative District of Quebec.

According to its Mayor, Inukjuak means “Big Person” or “Giant Person” in the Inuktitut language.

Two things stand out for me with this information.

The first is that the written form of Inuktitut is a pictographic script.

Pictographic script is one where a picture or symbol stands for a word or group of words.

Egyptian hieroglyphs are an example of a pictographic script.

The second thing is that Inukjuak’s meaning is interesting to me.

There is plenty of documentation in newspapers and photographs from the 1800s of the discovery of giant skeletons. The information about these discoveries was then subsequently removed from our conventional history, including giants’ bones in displays that went missing.

Inukjuak is situated on the Hudson Bay. Note the flat stone surface on the shore in the foreground…

…compared with this one at Lake Thunderbird, outside of Norman, Oklahoma. Could this represent some form of concrete, perhaps?

Concrete is defined as a hard building material made by mixing a cementing material and a mineral aggregate with enough water to cause the cement to set and bind the entire mass.

I took this photo last year of what looks like concrete at Tambo Machay, an ancient site located just outside of Cusco, Peru.

Back to Inukjuak, which is located at the mouth of the Innuksuak River.

The Inuktitut word Inuksuk refers to a human-made stone landmark or cairn. So here is an example of a cairn typical of northern Quebec.

Cairns similar to this Inuksuk are found in other places, like Amaru Muru, near Lake Titicaca in Peru…

…and this one is in Sedona, Arizona.

Are people just randomly stacking rocks geographically diverse places because they feel like it, or do these serve a purpose unknown to us in the present-day?

Another example of an inuksuk is on the Arnaud River of the Ungava Peninsula in northern Quebec, called the Hammer of Thor.

To give a visual perspective on its size, here is a side-by-side comparison of proportionally with a person.

One more thing to think about before I move on is this – could people of our relative stature today have realistically built all the monumental architecture around the world?

This is Beardshear Hall back on the University of Iowa campus back on this alignment in Ames, Iowa, one of countless examples about which I speak.

Another example with regards to the massive size of the structure is the Temple of Karnak in Luxor, Egypt.

From Inukjuak, the alignment crosses the Ungava Peninsula to the Hudson Strait. It passes in the general vicinity of Pingualuit National Park…

…where the Pingualuit crater is found. It is being a called a young impact crater of a meteorite. A meteorite impact formed a perfect circle in the landscape?

Pingualuit is one of the deepest lakes in North America, said to be 876 feet, or 267 meters, deep, and holds some of the purest fresh water in the world.

Compare Pingualuit with the Bacalar Cenote Azul on this same circle alignment back on the Yucatan Peninsula, not far from Chetumal, Mexico, said to be 295-feet, or 90-meters, deep.

My understanding about the planetary grid system is that it was intentionally created in accordance with sacred geometry, and that everything on it has meaning. When I just now realized that both of these deep circular wells are on peninsulas, I was guided to connect them with Algiers on the world map.

While Algiers may not be the third point of what could be an equilateral triangle relationship in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, there does appear to be an isosceles triangle relationship, one where two sides are of equal length, between these three points.

Next on the alignment we come to the uninhabited Eider Islands in the Hudson Strait. The red triangles indicate the presence of what are called stone beacons, and the blue circles indicate stone longhouses.

This is an example of one of the stone longhouses just south of the Eider Islands, found on Pamiok Island.

Akpatok Island is close by in the Ungava Bay of the Hudson Strait. It is also uninhabited.

It is described as rising out of the water as sheer cliffs.

This is a waterfall on Aktapok Island…

…compared with this waterfall on the Hawaiian Island of Molokai.

The alignment crosses the Hudson strait at the southern end of Baffin Island, across Resolution Island and Frobisher Bay. Baffin Island is part of Nunavut, the newest, largest, and most northerly territory of Canada. Nunavut was separated from the Northwest Territories in 1999.

Resolution Island became the site of an American military base starting in 1954. In 1974 it was turned over to the Canadian Government, and is still in operation as a short-range radar site.

Frobisher Bay was named after the English Navigator Martin Frobisher, who is said to have been the first European to come to it in 1576…

…when he was exploring for the Northwest Passage, a sea route believed to exist at that time from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean via the Arctic Ocean.

Before I follow the alignment across the North Atlantic Ocean to Greenland, I want to show you Mt. Thor, in the Auyuittuq National Park, north of Frobisher Bay on the eastern coast of Baffin Island.

Mount Thor is described as the tallest and steepest cliff in the world.

For comparison, this is the Matterhorn in the Alps, straddling Switzerland and Italy in Europe.

The alignment enters Greenland at Nuuk, the world’s northernmost capital city, and largest city of Greenland.

Greenland is called the world’s largest island, and is an autonomous constituent country of the Kingdom of Denmark.

It’s population is predominantly Inuit. They are said to be descended from the Thule people of Greenland.

Nuuk is situated at the mouth of the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord, on what is described as a mountainous peninsula. This is a photo of Old Nuuk, with a rocky promontory in the background…

…and this is a photo of what is called Sermitsiaq, or Saddle Mountain, in Nuup Kangerlua Fjord.

Next on the alignment is Tasiilaq, Greenland.

With a population of a little over 2,000, it is the most populous city on the east coast of Greenland.

Compare this rocky shoreline is in Tasiilaq…

…with the Gold Rock Beach of Lucayan National Park on the southern shore of Grand Bahama Island near Freetown…

…with the rocky beach of Pevek, on Russia’s far northern coast on the East Siberian Sea…

…and the rocky coast of Jipsam, in North Korea, near the port city of Chongjin.

I am going to end this post here, and pick up the alignment in Olafsvik, Iceland in the next post.

Author: Michelle Gibson

I firmly believe there would be no mysteries in history if we had been told the true history. I intend to provide compelling evidence to support this. I have been fascinated by megaliths most of my life, and my journey has led me to uncovering the key to the truth. I found a star tetrahedron on the North American continent by connecting the dots of major cities, and extended the lines out. Then I wrote down the cities that lined lined up primarily in circular fashion, and got an amazing tour of the world of places I had never heard of with remarkable similarities across countries. This whole process, and other pieces of the puzzle that fell into place, brought up information that needs to be brought back into collective awareness.

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